Business Protection

At Financial Advice Centre, we work with our clients to ensure they have the right business protection and insurances in place should the unexpected happen. This makes sure our clients are protecting their businesses if something were to go wrong.

For specific advice, please get in touch.

Partnership Protection

Partnership Protection

One of the great risks of a business partnership is that one of the partners may die or suffer a specified critical illness, with his or her share of the business passing to their beneficiaries. The safety net is a pre-arranged scheme to ensure the surviving partners have enough funds to buy out the departed partner's interest in the business.

Relevant Life Plan

Relevant Life Plan

A Relevant Life Plan is a death-in-service benefit taken out by a company on behalf of an employee.

Shareholder Protection

Shareholder Protection

In the interests of financial security, business stability, and continuity - particularly for private limited companies where there may only be a small number of principal shareholders - it is important to provide a safety net following the loss of a shareholder

Key Person Insurance

Key Person Insurance

Key person insurance is an important form of business insurance. There is no legal definition for 'key person insurance'. In general, it can be described as an insurance policy taken out by a business to protect that business for potential financial losses that could arise from the death or extended incapacity of an important member of the business specified on the policy.

Markets

Rubio vows to introduce law banning Chinese telecom firms from doing business in US
China's Foreign Minister warned of "grave consequences" if Huawei Technologies executive Meng Wanzhou isn't released after being detained in Canada on U.S. extradition charges.
China warned Canada on Saturday that there would be severe consequences if it did not immediately release Huawei Technologies Co Ltd's chief financial officer, calling the case "extremely nasty".
The story of how Prime Minister Theresa May reached agreement on how Britain can leave the European Union offers lessons for the future of Brexit, whatever happens when parliament votes on the deal on Tuesday.
Markets are more jittery about the prospect of a downturn than May’s doomed deal